Six Steps to Healing With Therapeutic Writing.

[et_pb_section bb_built=”1″][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_code _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” global_module=”5504″]https://f.convertkit.com/cc458db934/1b7e18d540.js[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_post_title _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” title=”on” meta=”on” author=”on” date=”on” categories=”off” comments=”on” featured_image=”off” featured_placement=”below” text_color=”dark” text_background=”off” title_font_size=”36px” title_text_color=”#75ae4c” text_orientation=”center” disabled=”off” disabled_on=”off|off|off” global_module=”4637″ /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text _builder_version=”3.0.106″ background_layout=”light”]

In this article we will are discussing the topic of Therapeutic Writing. This a process developed by the writers of My Life Experiment, to help get to the core of current unpleasant emotion. To feel this emotion and create a state of mental equilibrium that wasn’t being felt.

Why Write as a Means of Therapy?

Not staying in touch with our emotions has unpleasant consequences. Stress builds, thoughts get more resentful, and we may find ourselves getting snippier with people around us. We may even become more attached to unnecessary junk on our phones, overeat, overspend as well as other things that are a waste of time. These are some of the warning signs, telling us that some emotions need to be brought out of the dark.

It is critical that we use these signs as a prompt to get back in touch with these emotions. Not getting in touch with them at this time, will make negotiation with our impulses much more difficult. Our bodies understand more than we can immediately know. But in order to communicate with our bodies we have to listen.

A Therapeutic Writing process is a great way to get us into a place where we can listen to our bodies so we can hear it’s messages. Then get on the path of taking care of them in the best way possible.

For Therapeutic Writing, we have important guidelines to follow.

My Life Experiment’s Guidelines for Therapeutic Writing.

These guidelines have been developed out of necessity to help this recovering addict stay in the know with his rather intense emotional nature.

1. Timing is Important.

When we feel the need to get in touch with an emotion, it may not always be the right time to invoke this pain. I mean who in the hell wants to tap into heavy emotion and possibly break down at work? And what job will want us to?

On that same note there are all sorts of social situations that are not the appropriate time for tapping into impulses that are causing us anxiety. Or maybe your life is set up in a way that you can pretty much let loose emotionally anytime you please, then that’s great. If that is not the case, just let the impulses know that you will be getting in touch with them soon. Just letting ourselves know that we know we need to and plan to, can get us by until we get to a place to write in private.

2. Whatever Method of Writing is Perfect.

Therapeutic Writing can be done with any method of writing. Whether it is with pen and paper, at home with a computer and Word document, cellphone, whatever works.

Hell if it works best for you to use talk to text go for that as well. As long as we are able to get those thoughts out of our minds and into the reality of an outside canvas, it’s a go.

3. Music Can be Therapeutic Aid to Writing.

Using music to soften up our emotional energies, can be intensely therapeutic. The trick is using the music to help us sink into a more relaxed mental space, a space in which we can be vulnerable.

Using music that will amp up our impulses may energize us into a more anger than is desired. If there is anger we want it to surrender into the sadness the anger is protecting us from. pexels-photo-583843.jpeg

4. Anger, Resentment and Forgiveness.

Anger is an important part of this process but only insofar as it is a tool to let us know we feel we are being treated unfairly. Whether that anger is directed at someone else or whether it is directed at ourselves, the process is the same.

Anger and resentment are closely related. We feel resentment when we blame others or a piece of ourselves for being the cause of the anger and hurt that we are feeling.

Now of course other people have helped to cause our problems. And you sure a hell better believe we have caused plenty of our own. But the situations that led to pain and suffering for ourselves no longer exist outside of ourselves.

We are now the only ones reliving them over and over again for ourselves, causing our own suffering. It is time to let go, that is what forgiveness is all about.

Forgiveness is certainly not about forgetting though. We need to remember where that pain came from so that we don’t end up in similar situations again. But beating other people in our own minds does nothing but hurt ourselves. Remember this when writing. The anger we may build up when writing, is best released so that we may feel the powerful and painful energy beneath it.

5. Beware of Self-Pity.

Steering ourselves away from self-pity is a must. We need to stay in the reality that I am not a victim to what caused the feeling. And if we were victims at the time, we need to know that we no longer are at this moment.

Where ever the emotion stems from, it is only important insofar has it allows us to come into contact with it’s energy. Self-pity is a way of hiding ourselves from the responsibility of feeling emotions. The problem being that the only person that can feel these emotions is ourselves.

Acknowledge that the situation that led to the hurt is sad. Let the one inside know that we feel the pain and that we are here to make sure it never happens again. The pain doesn’t need to be shied away from, but support from trained professionals may be needed if the pain is too much.

6. How to Know the Therapeutic Writing Process Worked.

When engaged in Therapeutic Writing, understand that one sit down with pen and paper is not going to cure years of pain. But what it can do is alleviate the pain that is arriving and causing us anxiety at the moment.

Over time the benefits build, of course. But it is a process that is best used anytime life begins feeling too heavy and we need some relief.

This process will likely lead to feeling a great deal of emotion. And it will also likely lead to some tears. These tears are healing, but if they don’t come that doesn’t mean healing is not happening. These tears and processing emotions will help us attain the important state of being teachable.

Closing Thoughts.

Therapeutic Writing is beneficial for loosening up painful emotions. If done regularly when anxiety appears it can also keep us from acting out in others ways that we might otherwise deal with pent up stress.

Emotions can sometimes feel like they are dragging us around life, bogging us down, and causing us to act in ways we regret. This is not a feeling that we are in control of our own lives. And who wants to feel out of control emotionally? Being in control of our lives is much more appealing.

This process may lead to feeling painful emotions. Though the pain of feeling these emotions is far more desirable then the painful consequences of not feeling them.

Traumatic emotions from the past can be tremendously difficult to process. So if you find yourself in a space where those emotions seem to powerful to deal with alone when writing, then please do not do so. Elicit the support of trusted family and friends, and possibly that of a trained professional.

That is all that we have for you today, what you have written comes from struggle and growth. We hope that you will take what you have learned here and apply it to your life. But we also hope that you will use this information to Experiment with other ways to deal with freeing yourselves from painful emotion.
Thank you so much for stopping in to My Life Experiment today. If you enjoyed what you read then I would love for you to do a couple things for us.
  1. If you would like to help support this website by offsetting some of the costs of running it. There is a PayPal button below or in the right sidebar, depending on if you are viewing with mobile or by computer.
  2. Join our email list to Enroll in our Free 7 Day Impulse Negotiation Email Course! The course will help you stop pesky unwanted behaviors, as well as develop better relationship with your bodily impulses.

*This process is in no way meant to replace professional support. If you need further support please seek it anywhere you can find it.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_blurb title=”My Life Experiment” image=”https://mylifeexperimentdotblog.files.wordpress.com/2019/12/9db50-3ca83-2-1.jpg” _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” url_new_window=”off” use_icon=”off” icon_color=”#919191″ use_circle=”off” icon_placement=”top” background_layout=”light” use_circle_border=”off” use_icon_font_size=”off” global_module=”3875″]

Welcome! We are Travis and Casey Hagen, the writer’s and owner’s of My Life Experiment. As recovering Individuals, we are no strangers to leaving behind dysfunctional ways of living. Over the years we have become adept at managing our intense mental and emotional worlds. Finding healing from the past, peace in the present and new ways to bring about success for our futures. We promote Healthy Life Experimentation Principles for connecting with ourselves, our relationships, and finding healthier ways of bringing about success in our lives. Stick around and pick up what we have learned. You will not be disappointed.

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_code _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” background_color=”rgba(140,216,69,0.61)” global_module=”4785″]<form action=”https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr&#8221; method=”post” target=”_top”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”hidden” name=”cmd” value=”_s-xclick”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”hidden” name=”hosted_button_id” value=”XHQ66APF3D5W8″><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><table><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><tr><td><input type=”hidden” name=”on0″ value=”To Support My Life Experiment.”>To Support My Life Experiment.</td></tr><tr><td><select name=”os0″><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value=”Payment 1″>Payment 1 $3.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value=”Payment 2″>Payment 2 $5.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value=”Payment 3″>Payment 3 $10.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></select> </td></tr><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></table><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”hidden” name=”currency_code” value=”USD”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”image” src=”http://mylifeexperiment.blog&#8221; border=”0″ name=”submit” alt=”PayPal – The safer, easier way to pay online!”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><img alt=”” border=”0″ src=”https://www.paypalobjects.com/en_US/i/scr/pixel.gif&#8221; width=”1″ height=”1″><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></form><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Painful Thoughts: The Art of Loving the Pain Away.

[et_pb_section bb_built=”1″][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_post_title _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” title=”on” meta=”on” author=”on” date=”on” categories=”off” comments=”on” featured_image=”off” featured_placement=”below” text_color=”dark” text_background=”off” title_font_size=”36px” title_text_color=”#75ae4c” text_orientation=”center” disabled=”off” disabled_on=”off|off|off” global_module=”4637″ /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text]

Whether you have Mental Health issues or not, none of us are entirely loving of all the painful thoughts that roll through our heads.

In an earlier article on finding a way from Fear to Self-Love, a tip I gave was to simply tell the thoughts that I love them. Since then I have gotten positive reactions about the suggestion and find it important to delve into the concept a little further!

Thoughts of Loving or a Painful Nature.

Well wait, lets back track a bit! First of all, what in the world is a thought? Just Kidding! I’m not digging into that topic! there are plenty of different theories about what our thoughts are. I like theories plenty, but in this article, I am concerned only with the relationship I have with these thoughts.

Okay okay.. of course I am theorizing here when I say that I have a relationship with my thoughts. But it is an assumption that I feel safe with laying down here for you.

To say that I have a relationship with my thoughts lets you know that I don’t believe that I am my thoughts. I guess I also say that I have a relationship with myself as well. Does that mean that I am not myself? Whatever the case may be, I can love my thoughts, and I can love myself.  

My thoughts feel like the closest thing to me. Sometimes when I dive too deep into them, I have a hard time differentiating myself from them. These thoughts of mine come in a wide array of loudness, stickiness, lightness and all sorts of other qualities.

Thoughts can be peaceful, they can be violent, they can be a reflection of whatever emotion I currently may be feeling. Sometimes these thoughts are loving, and sometimes they are ready to cause pain in myself and others.

It is these painful thoughts that I want to put the attention on here. The happy go lucky, grateful, or content thoughts are a treat to for me to have. The painful thoughts are what give the trouble.

What are the Painful Thoughts?

The painful thoughts are the ones that have me in self-protection mode, looking for the ways that my surroundings might bring me harm (even in trustworthy and safe situations). These are the thoughts that have me building resentments against myself and others, as a way to justify isolating myself.

These painful thoughts might say something like this:

  1. You aren’t capable of doing that.
  2. Who do you think you are?
  3. Who do they think they are?
  4. Why is everybody else so screwed in the head?
  5. They are out to get me.
  6. I am such an idiot.
  7. That person isn’t good enough to hang with me.
  8. That dude needs a punch in the face.
  9. Who does he think he is looking at?
  10. I think the world would be better off without me.

All of the thoughts in this list have at least one thing in common to me, they are all coming from a body that is hurting and seeking to protect itself. As I see it, the thoughts that are coming from pain, are coming from emotional wounds. Wounds that are going to wreak havoc in subtle or even blatantly obvious ways.

It is easy to love my thoughts that feel good. Often times the painful thoughts are the ones I BELIEVE I shouldn’t be loving. Over my years in recovery though, I have found those are the flavor of thoughts that need love the most!

I Talk to the Pain.

When I am stuck in this type of thinking, I know that I am feeling hurt for some reason though I may not immediately notice this. I also likely won’t know where it is stemming from. I could already be isolating somewhat or being snippier to those around me before this comes to my attention.

But once I see that I am not feeling too hot, I can’t afford to turn away from the painful thinking. The spotlight needs to shine on that pain. I need to let it see that I am paying attention to it, and that I am not here to condemn it.

Then I can ask it some questions like:
  1. Are you okay buddy?
  2. What’s wrong?
  3. You know that everything is okay right?
  4. How can I help you?
  5. Is there a reason that you are hurting?

Showing loving respect to my thinking like this, creates the space for healing. By communicating with my thoughts, the emotion that is fueling the thought gets a chance to tell me about itself. It can tell me why it is hurting, and what I can do to help it out.

Sometimes I will communicate with my thoughts on paper, by writing in a therapeutic way. Other times I take care of it entirely inside of my own skull. And yes, I will even do it out loud when driving in the car from time to time! There is no shame in having a conversation with these thoughts that need attention. Just be careful that you don’t let these thoughts take you on a ride that you don’t want to go on.

Loving Painful Thoughts

Saying I love you to the Painful Thoughts.

When I am having painful thoughts like the ones I wrote above, I don’t always need to do an in-depth inventory with them to have healing. I have come to the realization, that simply telling these thoughts I love them has a positive impact.

I’m not saying that it will immediately make me feel better. What it will do is keep the pain from talking too loudly and getting out of control. It puts my body more at ease, reminding it that we are safe. Saying I love you to my thoughts often enough has helped me stay more closely in touch with the feeling of safety. And a safe body doesn’t feel the need to be on edge, ready to fight or flee! A safe body can relax.

These emotions also don’t go to my head when I let them know I love them, and that is fantastic! I spent a lot of my life totally lost in my pain filled thoughts without a good way to snap out of them. These days I get to have a positive relationship with my thinking a majority of the time. Letting my thoughts know that I love them where they are at, seems to help keep them from guiding my behavior into directions that cause me excess guilt. It lets them know that I am aware of their presence and that they are welcome here.

Quit Resisting the Painful Thoughts.

As the Psychologist Carl Jung once wrote “What we resist, persists;” I understand that saying I will welcome and love thoughts that can be disturbing and might seem dangerous. I also realize that doesn’t mean that I allow these painful thoughts to allow me to create even more pain in my world and others. But ignoring these thoughts or acting out on them brings the real danger! Loving them and giving them safe housing settles them down and lets the hurt that is packed inside of them to be felt. This leaves me to state the flip-side of what Carl Jung said, that “What we don’t resist, ceases to persist!”

I have deep gratitude for having come to this point in my life, where my mental health issues seem to be in a balanced state. My history with mental illness and the strides I have been able to make leads me to believe that anyone that is willing and ABLE to do the hard work can find their way to more mental and emotional stability. Though of course I realize that this work is far from easy. It is painful but in the end worth it.

Thank you so much for stopping in to My Life Experiment today. If you enjoyed what you read then I would love for you to do a couple things for us!

  1. Please Like and leave a comment below.
  2. Share this article on your social media.
  3. Join our email list, which will get you a copy of our Therapeutic Writing Guide, and have our new articles sent directly to your email.
  4. Follow our Facebook Page!

Much Love, Travis Hagen

 

*Now if you are having difficulty condemning thoughts you are having, you are certainly not alone. If the thoughts are guiding you into acting out in problematic ways (excess chemical usage, bouts of anger or rage, self-harm, etc…), then PLEASE talk to a mental health professional. This guidance given here is not meant to replace support from a mental health professional or replace taking the proper medications.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_blurb _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” title=”My Life Experiment” url_new_window=”off” use_icon=”off” image=”https://mylifeexperimentdotblog.files.wordpress.com/2019/12/9db50-3ca83-2-1.jpg&#8221; use_circle=”off” use_circle_border=”off” icon_placement=”top” use_icon_font_size=”off” background_layout=”light” global_module=”3875″]

Hello, we are Travis and Casey Hagen the writer’s and owner’s of My Life Experiment. As recovering Individuals, we are no strangers to leaving behind dysfunctional ways of living. Over the years we have become adept at managing our intense mental and emotional worlds to find healing from the past, peace in the present and new ways to bring about success for our futures. There is plenty for us to share with you about finding better ways to live. So please follow us on our journey as we share what we know, and continue to share as we invitably learn more.

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_code _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” background_color=”rgba(140,216,69,0.61)” global_module=”4785″]<form action=”https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr&#8221; method=”post” target=”_top”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”hidden” name=”cmd” value=”_s-xclick”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”hidden” name=”hosted_button_id” value=”XHQ66APF3D5W8″><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><table><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><tr><td><input type=”hidden” name=”on0″ value=”To Support My Life Experiment.”>To Support My Life Experiment.</td></tr><tr><td><select name=”os0″><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value=”Payment 1″>Payment 1 $3.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value=”Payment 2″>Payment 2 $5.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value=”Payment 3″>Payment 3 $10.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></select> </td></tr><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></table><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”hidden” name=”currency_code” value=”USD”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”image” src=”http://mylifeexperiment.blog&#8221; border=”0″ name=”submit” alt=”PayPal – The safer, easier way to pay online!”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><img alt=”” border=”0″ src=”https://www.paypalobjects.com/en_US/i/scr/pixel.gif&#8221; width=”1″ height=”1″><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></form><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Emotional Spending: Stopping it and Other Wreckless Habits

[et_pb_section bb_built=”1″][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text _builder_version=”3.0.106″ background_layout=”light”]

Emotional spending is a tricky subject. Which has a very similar flavor to other compulsive and reckless habits we may be acting on.

Today we are discussing the difficulty of stopping these entrenched and reckless behaviors like emotional spending. As well as seeking ideas for helping us move on from having these habitual nuisances a part of our lives.

Emotional Spending as Compulsion not Addiction.

With emotional spending I am not really talking about full on addiction. That is its own beast. Though compulsions of any sort are certainly fueled by an emotional driving force.

We at My Life Experiment are addicts in recovery. Our experiences both before and while in recovery have taught us a great deal about the power of triggered emotions. We understand the process that can ignite bodily impulses to act out in ways we don’t actually desire. Sometimes it can feel easier to spending money, eating too much, or stewing in self-pity.

When acting out emotionally, we generally are not eating because we are hungry. Not spending because we need the thing, nor overthinking something because we desire to. These behaviors are compulsive. Meaning that they are difficult or even feel impossible to control.

When it comes to compulsive spending, some days are easier than others.  But generally, when feeling stressed, it is easy to want to spend money on things that aren’t really needed.

In those times, the brain is looking for a fix. It will be a quick fix, and likely won’t be helpful, but the brain is doing its best.

Working Through the Problem.

When it comes to emotional spending, full on shopping addiction, or any other negative form of acting out. If we desire to stop it, then we already know that we have a problem, but we also need to admit that problem as well.

The decision then needs to be made to knock it off. Meaning a commitment to stop acting out on the problem is required. Then we can set up a plan of action to take back our lives in the area in which we feel out of control.

The difficulty of controlling the impulse to act out can be tremendous. There are times when I have refused the impulse to pull into a drive through window or buy something that wasn’t needed. I have also felt the temper tantrum erupt inside when not giving the impulse what it wants. If you can relate, then I empathize with you. I have come to realize that emotional acting out including emotional spending, is really about pain.

Thankfully I have been in recovery from addiction for years now. In this recovery time I have learned essential steps for stopping behavior, so I can get to the core of the emotional pain.

Stopping these compulsive behaviors has not necessarily been easy. But through our experiences with stopping harmful behaviors, I have realized how important preparation is for setting ourselves up for success.

DAILY AND LONG-TERM SUGGESTIONS FOR CONTROLLING SPENDING AND OTHER UNWANTED BEHAVIORS:

1. Get Grounded in the Moment.

Staying present in the moment is huge when it comes to stopping acting out. When we go on auto-pilot, we are more likely to act out in ways that we didn’t want to. There are many ways to ground ourselves in the present moment. We don’t need to bring a yoga mat wherever we go or keep a gratitude list handy at all times. All I really have to do is slow down, focus on taking some deep breathes, and recite a few things am grateful for. I swear it brings me back into the moment 90% of the time.

2. Remind Ourselves of Our Commitment to Change.

It is difficult to remember all of the decisions we have made about changing behaviors. But we maintain the strength of our decisions by following them up with daily reminders of the commitments we have made. If we have committed ourselves holding off from spending money on fast food for a month, we need to keep ourselves in the loop on this. If it is a deeply entrenched pattern, then we may need to remind ourselves several times a day.

3. Anticipate Possible Problem Areas

Give thought to what is coming up throughout the day. If we are seeking to spend less money, we need to spot areas where we might slip up. We, need to set ourselves up for success. If we feel the desire to go spend a bunch of money, then we can plan our days to avoid situations that will create added difficulty.

4. Avoid Testing Ourselves

Intentionally driving by a fast food restaurant just to have a smell, doesn’t seem like a good idea. Just like walking around the mall just to see what is new, just to browse. Dieticians might say don’t keep cookies in the house if you don’t want to end up eating them, it’s all the same principle. Quitting a behavior is difficult enough without added tests.

We don’t need to test ourselves unnecessarily. Enough temptations will show up in our lives as a matter of course. Being around too many temptations may weaken our resolve and we might be caught of guard as a result of our weakened resolve. So avoid unnecessary temptations but of course don’t avoid living life. There is a balance to be found in this area.

5. Maintain Emotional Support

Making changes in our lives can create great emotional discomfort. When stopping an entrenched behavior pattern, there will be pain that needs to be worked on. Dealing with these emotions requires support. Some of that support can come from ourselves, but don’t overlook the amazing benefits of the support received by trusting other people.

Some of us may be able to take care of these behaviors with the support of our friends and family. But please, if it seems that you need professional support in some way get some help. Especially if these behaviors are effecting you and your loved ones in ways that are harming your relationships.

6. Put rewards in place

Rewards are crazy important when it comes to staying vigilant with moving on from old behaviors. When us writers for My Life Experiment quit smoking, thinking about what we would do with the saved money was huge in keeping us motivated. The knowledge that we won’t be wasting that $75 a week that was spent something we didn’t want in the first place was highly motivating. On top of that we actually were able to think about where that money would towards building a better life. Through the hard times of stopping an entrenched behavior this promised reward was very much needed.

7. Do Your Research

There is a ton of practical information on the internet or in the library about how to stop unwanted behaviors. Study up and learn how to take back control.

8. Be Firm but Kind

Stopping behaviors that are entrenched is difficult work. But hear this. When we feel like acting out in ways we shouldn’t we may have emotional pain going on. That pain of course, does not make it okay to act out. The most loving and productive route we can take is to ask ourselves what is wrong, and then work on what my body has to tell me. That is where the good stuff is.

As I said before, it can be difficult, and sometimes very painful to refrain from acting out emotionally. But in the case of our financial lives and the rest of our lives, the benefits of controlling our behaviors far outweigh the difficulties. It may not always feel like it in the moment, but over time the benefits stack up.

That is all we have for today, and thank you so much for stopping in to My Life Experiment. What is written here has come from struggle and growth. We wish you growth on your path of leaving behind emotional spending and other unwanted behaviors. If you enjoyed what you read then we would love for you to do a couple things for us.

1. If you would like to help support this website by offsetting some of the costs of running it. There is a PayPal button below or in the right sidebar, depending on if you are viewing with mobile or by computer.

2. Join our email list below, which will get you a copy of our Therapeutic Writing Guide, and have our new articles sent directly to your email.

3. Share this article on your social media.

4. Follow our Facebook page!

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_blurb title=”My Life Experiment” image=”https://mylifeexperimentdotblog.files.wordpress.com/2019/12/9db50-3ca83-2-1.jpg&#8221; _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” url_new_window=”off” use_icon=”off” icon_color=”#919191″ use_circle=”off” icon_placement=”top” background_layout=”light” use_circle_border=”off” use_icon_font_size=”off” global_module=”3875″]

Welcome! We are Travis and Casey Hagen, the writer’s and owner’s of My Life Experiment. As recovering Individuals, we are no strangers to leaving behind dysfunctional ways of living. Over the years we have become adept at managing our intense mental and emotional worlds. Finding healing from the past, peace in the present and new ways to bring about success for our futures. We promote Healthy Life Experimentation Principles for connecting with ourselves, our relationships, and finding healthier ways of bringing about success in our lives. Stick around and pick up what we have learned. You will not be disappointed.

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_code _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” background_color=”rgba(140,216,69,0.61)” global_module=”4785″]<form action=”https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr&#8221; method=”post” target=”_top”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”hidden” name=”cmd” value=”_s-xclick”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”hidden” name=”hosted_button_id” value=”XHQ66APF3D5W8″><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><table><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><tr><td><input type=”hidden” name=”on0″ value=”To Support My Life Experiment.”>To Support My Life Experiment.</td></tr><tr><td><select name=”os0″><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value=”Payment 1″>Payment 1 $3.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value=”Payment 2″>Payment 2 $5.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value=”Payment 3″>Payment 3 $10.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></select> </td></tr><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></table><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”hidden” name=”currency_code” value=”USD”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”image” src=”http://mylifeexperiment.blog&#8221; border=”0″ name=”submit” alt=”PayPal – The safer, easier way to pay online!”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><img alt=”” border=”0″ src=”https://www.paypalobjects.com/en_US/i/scr/pixel.gif&#8221; width=”1″ height=”1″><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></form><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_post_title _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” title=”on” meta=”on” author=”on” date=”on” categories=”off” comments=”on” featured_image=”off” featured_placement=”below” text_color=”dark” text_background=”off” title_font_size=”36px” title_text_color=”#75ae4c” text_orientation=”center” disabled=”off” disabled_on=”off|off|off” global_module=”4637″ /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Changing Our Thoughts From Fearful to Self-loving.

[et_pb_section bb_built=”1″][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_post_title _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” title=”on” meta=”on” author=”on” date=”on” categories=”off” comments=”on” featured_image=”off” featured_placement=”below” text_color=”dark” text_background=”off” title_font_size=”36px” title_text_color=”#75ae4c” text_orientation=”center” disabled=”off” disabled_on=”off|off|off” global_module=”4637″ /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_code _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” global_module=”5504″]https://f.convertkit.com/cc458db934/1b7e18d540.js[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text]

Being able to work through fearful thoughts and return to a self-loving state is a beautiful thing. All of us that are capable of rational and sane thought has the ability to find this natural state of self-love.

Being an individual that has lived a life of addiction, recovery has made it necessary to learn this process. Here is my list of practical self-loving tips to help me let go and stay in my love, even when times feel rough.

1. Remind Ourselves that Our Thoughts and Emotions are not necessarily Reality.

This can be a difficult thing to grasp (especially when emotions are on high alert). It is also a freeing reality once this is grasped. When emotions are running high it can be easy to feel like the thoughts that feel out of control ARE reality. Getting ourselves to realize that these are just thoughts from hurting emotions can take a lot of the fear away.

It seems to me that fear, whether it is fear of a real or imagined event, is simply our bodies way of trying to get us to protect itself. This is all well and good when there is an actual threat. But it is not so necessary when there is no immediate danger.

When we are protecting ourselves from imaginary threats, there is only one person we are protecting ourselves against. That person is ourselves. Sure there is self-love involved with protecting ourselves from real threats. But being stuck in fear distorts our connection with reality. And being disconnected from reality takes its mental and emotional toll. Our way back into reality is to find our way back into a self-loving state.

please_do_not_feed_the_fears.jpg

2. Sincerely Tell the Thought “I love you.”

I find it a little strange how effective it can be to tell my thoughts that I love them. Saying I love you, to anything, can help us put my guards down. It is no different when we say this to our thoughts, no matter how unsafe they seem to be making us feel.

Saying I love you to the thought helps to see through it so that we can get some healing for the fear-filled energy that is trying to be felt. Of course, simply telling a heavily fearful thought I love you will not pacify it enough to make everything feel okay. We will need to sincerely tell the though I love you, and back that up by allowing ourselves to be vulnerable to its energies.

If there are deeply held fear fueling the thought, we may need to take our sincerity deep enough to bring about tears.

3. Just Breathe and don’t actively think at all.

When feeling overwhelmed at times, even saying I love you to thoughts can start a cascade of thinking that may be tough to handle. In these times dropping our thinking as much as possible until our minds have a chance to clear is probably best.

Putting our attention on mindful breathing, and feeling the sensations in our bodies can bring deep relaxation. And relaxation in these times is likely what we need. As our minds relax, our bodies can relax, thus creating a calm, maybe even serene state to our entire beings.

Initially, it may not be easy to surrender our thoughts and impulses the moment. But if we stick with it, the calm will come.

4. Talk to Someone that is Trusted.

Even if you are a take care of your own emotions as much as possible person like myself, trusting others is still a necessity for coping with fearful thinking. Sometimes our go-to self-soothing methods won’t take us to our impulses to a place of healing. In this case, having trusted individuals we can chat with is indispensable.

We can use the trusted people in our lives to help us calm down. As well as for working through our fear, relating with our pain, and reminding us that we are loved. There is a healing energy that is offered up when we become vulnerable with people that deeply care for us. Trying to do this life thing all alone is a silly thing. Loving ourselves, our thoughts and our emotions is much easier when we let people love us.

Allowing others to help us is one of the most self-loving things we can do for ourselves.

5. Take a Small Step in Taking Care of an Errand.

Getting behind on the priorities we have is a big cause of emotional turmoil. Sometimes the list of things that need attention seems so daunting. It can be easy to get stuck in feeling like it all needs to be done right now. And equally as easy to get too hard on ourselves because we are falling behind.

A great start to remedy this is to start a small to-do list. Simple enough right? The list doesn’t have to be complicated, simply list a few things that aren’t getting done, and commit to doing them.

Fear is a sign-post that will let us know that we need to get our butts in gear. It shows us that the proper preparations are not being made to have the type of life that we desire to live. Taking care of something that needs our attention may very well take the fear away.

Staying on top of our priorities is a highly self-loving thing to do.

Closing Thoughts.

Fear to Self-Loving

These are the habits I have developed to stay grounded in my love. Developing them so that I can be my best possible self. It helps keep me in my right mind and helps me in touch with my emotions.

Integrating these tips into our lives even when light fear is present, or when there isn’t fear at all makes it easier to practice when times are tough.

My hope is that this list can help you find self-loving results similar to the those that I have received in my life.

 

  1. If you would like to help support this website by offsetting some of the costs of running it. There is a PayPal button below or in the right sidebar, depending on if you are viewing with mobile or by computer.
  2. Join our email list to Enroll in our Free 7 Day Impulse Negotiation Email Course!

 

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_blurb title=”My Life Experiment” image=”https://mylifeexperimentdotblog.files.wordpress.com/2019/12/9db50-3ca83-2-1.jpg&#8221; _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” url_new_window=”off” use_icon=”off” icon_color=”#919191″ use_circle=”off” icon_placement=”top” background_layout=”light” use_circle_border=”off” use_icon_font_size=”off” global_module=”3875″]

Welcome! We are Travis and Casey Hagen, the writer’s and owner’s of My Life Experiment. As recovering Individuals, we are no strangers to leaving behind dysfunctional ways of living. Over the years we have become adept at managing our intense mental and emotional worlds. Finding healing from the past, peace in the present and new ways to bring about success for our futures. We promote Healthy Life Experimentation Principles for connecting with ourselves, our relationships, and finding healthier ways of bringing about success in our lives. Stick around and pick up what we have learned. You will not be disappointed.

To see our Terms and Conditions click here

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_code _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” background_color=”rgba(140,216,69,0.61)” global_module=”4785″]<form action=”https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr&#8221; method=”post” target=”_top”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”hidden” name=”cmd” value=”_s-xclick”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”hidden” name=”hosted_button_id” value=”XHQ66APF3D5W8″><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><table><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><tr><td><input type=”hidden” name=”on0″ value=”To Support My Life Experiment.”>To Support My Life Experiment.</td></tr><tr><td><select name=”os0″><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value=”Payment 1″>Payment 1 $3.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value=”Payment 2″>Payment 2 $5.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value=”Payment 3″>Payment 3 $10.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></select> </td></tr><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></table><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”hidden” name=”currency_code” value=”USD”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type=”image” src=”http://mylifeexperiment.blog&#8221; border=”0″ name=”submit” alt=”PayPal – The safer, easier way to pay online!”><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><img alt=”” border=”0″ src=”https://www.paypalobjects.com/en_US/i/scr/pixel.gif&#8221; width=”1″ height=”1″><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></form><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_social_media_follow _builder_version=”3.0.106″ url_new_window=”off” follow_button=”on” background_layout=”light” saved_tabs=”all” global_module=”5661″][et_pb_social_media_follow_network _builder_version=”3.0.106″ social_network=”facebook” skype_action=”call” url=”https://www.facebook.com/MyLifeExperimentblog/&#8221; background_color=”#3b5998″ use_background_color_gradient=”off” background_color_gradient_start=”#2b87da” background_color_gradient_end=”#29c4a9″ background_color_gradient_type=”linear” background_color_gradient_direction=”180deg” background_color_gradient_direction_radial=”center” background_color_gradient_start_position=”0%” background_color_gradient_end_position=”100%” background_color_gradient_overlays_image=”off” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on” background_size=”cover” background_position=”center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_blend=”normal” allow_player_pause=”off” background_video_pause_outside_viewport=”on” box_shadow_style=”none”]

Facebook

[/et_pb_social_media_follow_network][/et_pb_social_media_follow][et_pb_social_media_follow _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” url_new_window=”off” follow_button=”on” background_layout=”light” global_module=”5660″][et_pb_social_media_follow_network _builder_version=”3.0.106″ social_network=”pinterest” skype_action=”call” url=”https://www.pinterest.com/mylifeexperiment/pins/&#8221; background_color=”#cb2027″ use_background_color_gradient=”off” background_color_gradient_start=”#2b87da” background_color_gradient_end=”#29c4a9″ background_color_gradient_type=”linear” background_color_gradient_direction=”180deg” background_color_gradient_direction_radial=”center” background_color_gradient_start_position=”0%” background_color_gradient_end_position=”100%” background_color_gradient_overlays_image=”off” parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on” background_size=”cover” background_position=”center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_blend=”normal” allow_player_pause=”off” background_video_pause_outside_viewport=”on” box_shadow_style=”none”]

Pinterest

[/et_pb_social_media_follow_network][/et_pb_social_media_follow][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Opening up Through a Compliment Experiment.

[et_pb_section bb_built=”1″ inner_width=”90%” inner_max_width=”1398px”][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ custom_padding__hover=”|||” custom_padding=”|||”][et_pb_post_title _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” title=”on” meta=”on” author=”on” date=”on” categories=”off” comments=”on” featured_image=”off” featured_placement=”below” text_color=”dark” text_background=”off” title_font_size=”36px” title_text_color=”#75ae4c” text_orientation=”center” disabled=”off” disabled_on=”off|off|off” global_module=”4637″ /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ custom_padding__hover=”|||” custom_padding=”|||”][et_pb_code _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” global_module=”5504″]https://f.convertkit.com/cc458db934/1b7e18d540.js[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type=”2_3″ custom_padding__hover=”|||” custom_padding=”|||”][et_pb_text _builder_version=”3.27.1″ text_text_shadow_horizontal_length=”text_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ text_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_vertical_length=”text_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ text_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_blur_strength=”text_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ text_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” link_text_shadow_horizontal_length=”link_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ link_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_vertical_length=”link_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ link_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_blur_strength=”link_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ link_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ul_text_shadow_horizontal_length=”ul_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ ul_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_vertical_length=”ul_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ ul_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_blur_strength=”ul_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ ul_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ol_text_shadow_horizontal_length=”ol_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ ol_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_vertical_length=”ol_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ ol_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_blur_strength=”ol_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ ol_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” quote_text_shadow_horizontal_length=”quote_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ quote_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_vertical_length=”quote_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ quote_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_blur_strength=”quote_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ quote_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_text_shadow_horizontal_length=”header_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_vertical_length=”header_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_blur_strength=”header_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_2_text_shadow_horizontal_length=”header_2_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_2_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_vertical_length=”header_2_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_2_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_blur_strength=”header_2_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_2_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_3_text_shadow_horizontal_length=”header_3_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_3_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_vertical_length=”header_3_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_3_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_blur_strength=”header_3_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_3_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_4_text_shadow_horizontal_length=”header_4_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_4_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_vertical_length=”header_4_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_4_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_blur_strength=”header_4_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_4_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_5_text_shadow_horizontal_length=”header_5_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_5_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_vertical_length=”header_5_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_5_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_blur_strength=”header_5_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_5_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_6_text_shadow_horizontal_length=”header_6_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_6_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_vertical_length=”header_6_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_6_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_blur_strength=”header_6_text_shadow_style,%91object Object%93″ header_6_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” box_shadow_horizontal_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_vertical_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_blur_tablet=”40px” box_shadow_spread_tablet=”0px” z_index_tablet=”500″]

How important is it to give compliments? That is exactly what this article is all about.

This was exactly my question after I was in a car accident with a gal that may or may not had insurance. After that accident, I started realizing that the emotions I was feeling were making it too easy to get snippy with those close to me (such as my wife and a couple of close friends). So I realized that I needed to do something about how I was feeling.

An idea occurred to me to possibly help with these emotions, as well as to find some evidence for a future path through similar aggressive feelings.

I decided that I would roughly concoct a little compliment experiment. An experiment where I would focus on sharing more compliments with whomever I come into contact with, and especially those close to me.

Be Aggressive, Do Nothing Or Compliment?

I once read a psychological study where the researcher set participants up to feel unwanted emotions, and then gave them outlets for processing them.

One group was advised to punch a punching bag, they also were advised to think about blasting someone who angered them with a blow horn. The other group was given a much more low key option, to basically sit and do nothing. These were all used to see if one, more than the other were more effective in getting participants out of feelings of aggression.

The study found that acting aggressively did not actually help the emotional processing. They found that doing nothing was actually more effective.

With this information, I have to believe that if doing nothing is more effective at processing anger and other similar emotions, then doing something positive, like complimenting others will be even better.

Complementing Rather more than Critiquing.

I was given the advice one time from my recovery sponsor that “for every critique of a life instance, you should give at least 3 positives.” The relevance of this advice can be seen clearly though, it comes down to building up my relationships instead of tearing them down.

Giving compliments can be an especially difficult thing to do when the energies of painful thoughts and emotions are present. Often times emotions like these are looking to be aggressive, either subtly or blatantly causing trouble for others.

It can be difficult to give compliments when feeling hurt. But it seems that being positive when not feeling positive, can allow for processing of the emotion.

The wisdom of the above psychological study is that emotions aren’t most effectively processed with aggressive intent and action.

What is needed is a better way, which is where complimenting others comes into the picture.

compliment
Photo by Christin Hume on Unsplash

The Compliment Experiment.

Over two weeks time my mission was to be complimenting. I complimented others, myself, and life itself. I ran with the idea of saying 3 complimentary ideas for every critique.

I didn’t perform a study in which I logged each time I gave a compliment or didn’t, or how many were given in each day. No, I simply went out with the mission of giving many more compliments than I was accustomed to and checked in on how I felt at the end of the night.

Results of the Experiment.

Interestingly enough, around the conclusion of this experiment, I finally found out that the lady that totaled my car the week before didn’t have car insurance.

After getting that news, I found it very difficult to give compliments. Offering pleasantries felt against the grain. But I kept the experiment in mind and started looking for opportunities to allow the world around me to know that they are appreciated. I complimented a friend of mine, my wife, and then I just started complimenting myself in my thoughts.

What started out as a very difficult emotional state, eventually worked into me feeling better. I, of course, didn’t walk around crapping rainbows, but I didn’t sink into an mental-emotional turmoil. There were certainly angry feelings to deal with, but they didn’t cause any problems.

There are some aspects to my impulses that I hadn’t seen quite as clearly before this experiment. First, it is far easier to critique than it is to give compliments. And Second, there is always a compliment to be given if the willingness to do so is there.

This experiment has given a clear method for developing more life satisfaction, and a route to bring me back to being grateful. It taught that it is much easier to feel better when that piece of the brain that is far too critical, gets a chance a shut up. The experiment also showed me a high-quality method for processing my emotions and keeping myself healthy, growing, and becoming more efficient.

As well, it showed me that when I’m alone with myself and talking about myself, it is just as important to be giving myself enough compliments. Quite often, we are our own worst critics, and it is much easier to notice the qualities I enjoy in others when I am grounded in the recognition of my own.

compliment
Photo by Kenan Buhic on Unsplash
That is all we have for today and thank you so much for stopping in to My Life Experiment. What is written here has come from struggle and growth.
We sincerely wish you amazing success in getting the benefits of being a complimentary person. I offer you the challenge of applying what you have read here, as well as experimenting with your own healthy process for using compliments to help find your way into feeling better.
We truly believe that if you take today’s lessons to heart and apply them, that you will greatly benefit. If you enjoyed what you read then I would love for you to do a couple things for us.
  1. If you would like to help support this website by offsetting some of the costs of running it. There is a PayPal button below or in the right sidebar, depending on if you are viewing with mobile or by computer.
  2. Join our email list to Enroll in our Free 7 Day Impulse Negotiation Email Course! The course will help you stop pesky unwanted behaviors, as well as develop a healthier relationship with your bodily impulses.

 

 

 

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_3″ custom_padding__hover=”|||” custom_padding=”|||”][et_pb_blurb title=”My Life Experiment” icon_color=”#919191″ image=”https://mylifeexperimentdotblog.files.wordpress.com/2019/12/9db50-3ca83-2-1.jpg&#8221; _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” url_new_window=”off” use_icon=”off” use_circle=”off” icon_placement=”top” animation=”top” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” global_module=”3875″]

Welcome! We are Travis and Casey Hagen, the writer’s and owner’s of My Life Experiment. As recovering Individuals, we are no strangers to leaving behind dysfunctional ways of living. Over the years we have become adept at managing our intense mental and emotional worlds. Finding healing from the past, peace in the present and new ways to bring about success for our futures. Life is meant to be lived. That is why we promote Healthy Life Experimentation Principles for connecting with ourselves, our relationships, and finding healthier ways of bringing about success in our lives. Stick around and pick up what we have learned. You will not be disappointed.

To see our Terms and Conditions click here

 

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_code _builder_version=”3.0.106″ saved_tabs=”all” background_color=”rgba(140,216,69,0.61)” global_module=”4785″]<form action="https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr&quot; method="post" target="_top"><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type="hidden" name="cmd" value="_s-xclick"><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type="hidden" name="hosted_button_id" value="XHQ66APF3D5W8"><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><table><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><tr><td><input type="hidden" name="on0" value="To Support My Life Experiment.">To Support My Life Experiment.</td></tr><tr><td><select name="os0"><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value="Payment 1">Payment 1 $3.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value="Payment 2">Payment 2 $5.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –> <option value="Payment 3">Payment 3 $10.00 USD</option><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></select> </td></tr><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></table><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type="hidden" name="currency_code" value="USD"><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><input type="image" src="http://mylifeexperiment.blog&quot; border="0" name="submit" alt="PayPal – The safer, easier way to pay online!"><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><img alt="" border="0" src="https://www.paypalobjects.com/en_US/i/scr/pixel.gif&quot; width="1" height="1"><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –></form><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]